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Sunday, December 09, 2007

Au Revoir Parapluie

I saw a brilliant dance performance at the Brooklyn Academy of Music last night called "Au Revoir Parapluie." It was like a mash-up of Charlie Chaplin (the director and star is Chaplin's grandson), Harold Pinter, David Elsewhere, Penn & Teller, Cirque du Soleil and Terry Gilliam. The audience was gasping and hooting, including lots of children, which is a rare thing for serious dance to achieve.

The show runs through Sunday, Dec 16 (2007).

From Ben Brantley's review in the Times:

Mr. Thiérrée’s character believes he has lost his daughter, only to discover she is on his back; he swirls into a waltz with what he thinks is his wife, then realizes she is not with him. An idyllic trip to the seashore is booby-trapped with blades of grass that turn into weapons and a giant predatory fish. Such images have the resonance of fragments from nightmares. (The next morning, I found I had twice written in my notes, “I DREAMED THIS.”)

Giant fishhooks figure memorably in this production, as do a rainstorm of badminton birdies and what has to be the most fabulous costume of the year: a spinning white hat and matching Victorian dress with an animated train worn by Ms. Sendow.

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