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Monday, November 27, 2006

Was Howard Dean's 50-state strategy right?

Post-election, consider this pre-election thought from David Kaiser's excellent History Unfolding blog:
I don’t know how much Howard Dean has to do with the impending House victory (and the possible, although unlikely, Senate one), but his 50-state strategy obviously had a point. The Democrats are going to win largely because they attacked apparently secure Republican positions not only in the Northeast, but even in places like Colorado, Indiana, Arizona, and Kentucky.
From a fundraising perspective, Dean was a disaster--the Democratic National Committee had only 60% of the money the RNC raised. It also might have been wise to spend a little more in the states where we won Senate seats by less than one percent. But maybe he does deserve credit for the breadth of the victory in the House.

I can imagine that Christopher Hitchens, who has called Dean a "raving lunatic" and a "pathalogical liar", might disagree. His application for American citizenship was scheduled to clear before the election; I wonder whom he voted for, and if, as a Washington DC resident, he resented not being able to elect a voting congressman or senator.

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