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Friday, October 13, 2006

How do you substitute _____ for ______ ?

From the Guardian, October 12, 2006:
"...Palm has kept much of the design and styling of its Treo series of PDAs and substituted its own OS for a Windows one..."
So which is it that the PDAs run now? I read that sentence as saying it's Palm's own OS, but they make clear in the article that the device now "runs the Windows Mobile operating system". I think of the direct object of 'substitute' as being the new thing being brought in, and the indirect object the old thing being replaced. What is the correct pattern for this, or do people do it both ways?

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